Alaska Moose Hunt Inspires New Series

October 22, 2013 | Filed in: Art Progress | No Comments »
My canoe partner, Jason, and I making our way down stream with a canoe full of Jason's caribou.

My canoe partner, Jason, and I making our way down stream with a canoe full of Jason’s caribou.

 

I recently was lucky enough to be invited by some friends on a moose and caribou hunt in Alaska.  The trip was amazing!  And the trip was a challenge.  We lined canoes up a gorgeous river valley, set up camp for 6 days, glassed and glassed every day searching for legal animals.  Seven of us went, and three were hunting.  We came out with a moose and a caribou.  It was the trip of a lifetime and I feel so fortunate to be able to go.  The landscape combined with the tribal feel of our hunt inspired my next painting series that I will begin this winter.

 

Full moon rising above our camp.

Full moon rising above our camp.

We also had a great show of Northern lights this night.  Imagine a wide open valley with snow covered mountains glowing in the moonlight, and then Northern lights shimmering down above all that!  Amazing to say the least.

Dan packing out his moose rack and meat.

Dan packing out his moose rack and meat.

 

Everyone quartering  the moose together.

Everyone quartering the moose together.

It was such a great group to go with- thanks Team Moose Hunt!  Everyone helped out and had good humor, even when we woke up to 5 inches of wet snow and the valley socked in.

Brook and Josh smiling at waking up to wet snow.  Hey... it is better then work.

Brook and Josh smiling at waking up to wet snow. Hey… it is better then work.

Caoneing out in canoes loaded with moose meat.

Caoneing out in canoes loaded with moose meat.

Canoeing Out

Canoeing Out

The Bounty.

The Bounty.

We all processed the meat in my friends’ driveway. One bull carinbou and one bull moose gave five families over well 100 lbs of meat each.  I am pretty sure my trip up and back canceled out any carbon miles I save by eating this, but still….    it is delicious!

 

 

Bike Racks for Downtown Laramie!

August 17, 2013 | Filed in: Art Progress | No Comments »
Pronghorn bike rack

Pronghorn bike rack

I am pleased to announce that I won the call for proposal to design bike racks for downtown Laramie.  For months now I have been working with the Downtown Alliance and the bike rack committee to design and fabricate some racks.  The committee has been wonderful to work with and this has been a true collaboration.  Schlagel Manufacturing in Torrington is doing the steel cutouts for us,  local welder Colter Floyd is fabricating them, and Dewey, owner of the Pedal House, is powder coating them.

This Pronghorn rack was in the test batch.  We are in the process of getting many more made, in different designs.  The goal is to represent the different elements that make up our unique community  here in Laramie.    It has definitely been a challenge to work within the codes needed for public art, but I am getting the hang of it.

It has been a fun project and I am excited to be part of enhancing our community through art!

 

 

Solo Show at Honey Bee Gallery today!

May 3, 2013 | Filed in: Art Progress | No Comments »

This evening we will celebrate a new body of work, “As Told By The Wind…”, with a solo show at Honey Bee Gallery.  117 E Grand, Laramie, 6-9 pm.  I’m excited to be showing this  series of paintings together.

“Snowies in July”; walnut ink, sumi ink, watercolor, rice paper; 12″ x 48″; © Meg Thompson; 2013

 

“As Told By The Wind . . .”

“In this series of paintings, artist Meg Thompson explores the landscape and history of the American West through the omniscient point of view of  The Wind.  This constant force affects every part of life, from the weather patterns to the formation of the terrain.  Using the long scroll format of the Chinese dynasty era landscape paintings, Meg creates a visual map of the wide vistas and intimate rhythms of daily life in Wyoming.  Blending these two traditions, one ancient and one young, shows how we are all perpetually intertwined with our landscapes.”

“Snowies in May”; walnut ink, sumi ink, watercolor, rice paper; 12″ x 48″; © Meg Thompson; 2013

 

Touchstone is almost here!

November 8, 2012 | Filed in: Art Progress | No Comments »

Touchstone is an exhibition and sale put on by the the Laramie Artist Project, a group of professional artists of Albany County.  Come see all this great local art!   Saturday Nov. 17, 10-5pm, Sunday Nov. 18, 1pm-5pm.  http://www.laramieartistsproject.com/

 

 

Outdoor Water and Bone Installation pieces

November 8, 2012 | Filed in: Art Progress | No Comments »

This fall while at Brush Creek Artist residency I created two outdoor installations in the creek.   I just finished editing my footage into two videos.  I will be presenting them both this Friday at the University of Wyoming Art Museum Symposium on Water:   http://www.uwyo.edu/artmuseum/get-involved/symposia.html

There is a great list of presenters…come check it out and see the diversity of our relationships to water!

You can watch the videos here:

“Fishing for Our Histories”

“Emerging”

 

 

 

 

 

Brush Creek Artist Residency..oh so sweet!

October 5, 2012 | Filed in: Art Progress | 1 Comment »

I  just returned from two weeks at the Brush Creek Artist Residency, which is a residency amidst  the Brush Creek dude ranch-a beautiful dude ranch in the platte valley near Saratoga, Wyoming.  I must say, it was a life changing experience.  I was fortunate enough to be with 7 other amazing, supportive, engaged artists.  It is such a gift to have time to focus on your work away from daily life.  It gave me the needed room to explore some new ideas and flail around, which is an uncomfortable but necessary part of the artistic process.  To get any good work, often we must make a lot of bad work.  And in daily life when we are trying to meet deadlines and sell pieces, often what falls away is the exploratory nature of creating.

Brush Creek Tress

Brush Creek Trees

Old Brush Creek Ranch Sign

Old Brush Creek Ranch Sign

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Those two weeks gave me time and space to try some new things, struggle with some old work, and most importantly, connect with other artists doing the same thing.  I learned so much from the other artists.  It is such a treat to be able to eat family style dinner together with a group of artist after everyone worked all day in their respective medium.  We had many enlightening discussions about process, the struggles and gifts of being an artist, and above all else just connected about this strange life we all live.  A few days into it I felt as if I landed in a country where everyone spoke my language, but I had been away so long I forgot I wasn’t speaking my native tongue at home.   I have many artist friends and colleagues I am in touch with in my daily life, but we rarely have large chunks of uninterrupted time to really discuss our daily work and process.  This can be an isolating career at times and that isolation sneaks up on you, unawares.

View From Artist Camp

View From Artist Camp

What is Meg up to?

What is Meg up to?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I had been working on painting series of Contemporary Life in Wyoming and planned to continue that at Brush Creek.  But once I got there I had a really hard time painting at first.    I just wasn’t feeling the “magic” about this series anymore.  One day I decided to stop struggling in the studio and to go outside and play around with my outdoor installation series again.  I have wanted to pick this body of work up again, but I wasn’t planning on doing anything with it at Brush Creek.  But once I let myself go in that direction, it came together.   I ended up doing two temporary installations at the creek with willows and bones.  After that, I was able to return to the paintings with more success.

from "Fishing For Our History" Installation

from “Fishing For Our History” Installation

 

from Installation #2

from Installation #2 (unnamed so far)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above is  sneak preview of these two installations.   I have done a prairie series before, for which I am still doing more pieces, but this is the first water installations I’ve done.    I really like to incorporate found materials and movement, like wind or water, into my outdoor installations.  They are so far always temporary, as I take them down after the initial showing and capturing a lot of footage.  Then I go back to the office/studio and attempt to assemble a movie and photographic show out of the pieces.  Stay tuned to see more when they are ready to show!

I would like to sincerely thank Beth and Bruce White and the Brush Creek Foundation for the Arts, it’s wonderful director, Katie Christensen and the other artists I was fortunate enough to get to know there:  Bill Haskell, painter; Anh-THuy Nguyen, conceptual artist; Kristen Martincic, printmaker;  Carolyne Wright, poet; Anne Guzzo, composer; and Jardine Libaire, writer.  All do really amazing work– look them up!  I was honored to be one of them.  Thank you all, Strange America. 😉